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5.3  Tsunami runup onto a complex three-dimensional beach

Author
Stéphane Popinet
Command
sh monai.sh
Version
110107
Required files
monai.gfs (view) (download)
monai.sh 3D.gfv leveque.gfv mesh.gfv overhead.gfv probe.gfv
Running time
50 minutes

This example is a classical validation test case for tsunami models. It was proposed at the "Third international workshop on long-wave runup models". It is based on experimental data obtained in a wave tank in order to understand the extreme runups observed near the village of Monai during the 1993 Okushiri tsunami.

The animation in Figure 38 gives a general idea of the geometry and time evolution of the modelled tsunami. The bathymetry data and channel geometry matches that used in the experimental wave tank. The water surface is forced on the open boundary with the experimentally-imposed waveform (outside the field of view on the right-hand-side in the animation). The initial dryout as well as extreme runup in the narrow central valley are clearly visible in the animation, as well as wave reflections from the boundaries and dimples in the water surface caused by underwater vortices.


Figure 38: Animation of the water surface (light blue) and bathymetry (white) for the Monai tsunami.

Another view of the process together with the adaptive mesh used to resolve the flow is given in Figure 39. This figure can be compared with that of LeVeque and George (Figure 4 of [3]).


Figure 39: Evolution of the free surface elevation (left column) and corresponding adaptive mesh (right column). Contour lines of the topography are represented. The areas in white in the left column are dry. The wet areas are coloured according to free surface elevation relative to the unperturbed water surface. A “jet” colour scale is used with a maximum value (dark red) of +5 cm and a minimum value (dark blue) of −5 cm.
t = 10 s
t = 12 s
t = 14 s
t = 16 s
t = 18 s
t = 20 s

Experimental data includes free-surface elevation timeseries at several locations (see Figure 39, t = 18 s). Figures 40, 41 and 42 give comparisons of the experimental and numerical timeseries.


Figure 40: Time-series of free-surface elevation measured and calculated at the location of probe 5.


Figure 41: Time-series of free-surface elevation measured and calculated at the location of probe 7.


Figure 42: Time-series of free-surface elevation measured and calculated at the location of probe 9.

Finally, the animation in Figure 43 gives a comparison between the overhead video of the experiment and the corresponding view of the simulation.


Figure 43: Comparison between the video of the experiment (left) and the simulation results (right).

More details on this simulation and the method used is given in [4].


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